South Dakota Opioid Resource Hotline 1-800-920-4343

Opioids are highly addictive narcotic substances commonly prescribed for chronic pain after surgery or injury. Opioids must be used with extreme caution even though they can provide powerful relief for those struggling with chronic pain.

There are SERIOUS RISKS associated with taking opioids including: addiction, long-term health problems, PARALYSIS and DEATH.

1 in 4 people who are prescribed opioids STRUGGLE with ADDICTION.

In SOUTH DAKOTA, opioid deaths have STEADILY INCREASED since 2012.

SOME OF THE MOST COMMONLY PRESCRIBED OPIOIDS ARE:

Actiq
Astramorph
Codeine
Conzip
Demerol
DepoDur
Dilaudid

Duragestic
Duramorph
Endocet
Exalgo
Hydrocodone (Vicodin)
Hydromorphone
Fentanyl

Lorcet
Lortab
Meperidine
Methadone
Morphine
MS-Contin
Norco

Oxycodone (Oxycontin/Oxecta)
Percocet
Roxicet
Roxicodone
Tramadol
Ultram
Ventura

What are the risks?

Opioid addiction can start before you know it. ANYONE who takes prescription opioids CAN BECOME ADDICTED to them.

Unintentional OVERDOSE IS A RISK for ANYONE who takes prescription opioids. Long-term health problems, paralysis, coma, and DEATH are all potential life-altering consequences.

MISUSE IS INCREASED when there is a past or current substance use disorder, untreated psychiatric disorders, younger age, and social or family environments that encourage misuse.

HOW DO OPIOIDS
AFFECT THE BRAIN?

Opioids activate receptors in the brain to block pain signals. They can cause drowsiness, confusion, nausea, shallow breathing, or stop a person’s breathing completely.

They can also cause euphoria, especially when more pills than prescribed are taken, or when mixed with alcohol or other medications, or taken for other reasons than intended.

What are the side effects?

Even when taken as directed, prescription opioids can cause harmful side effects including:

  • increased sensitivity to pain
  • nausea & vomiting
  • constipation
  • sleepiness & dizziness
  • dry mouth, itching & sweating
  • confusion
  • low energy & depression
  • low levels of testosterone which can result in lower sex drive

WHAT ABOUT FENTANYL?

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid often used to treat severe pain caused by advanced cancer and is 50-100X more potent than morphine.

Prescription fentanyl is highly addictive and should only be used under the strict supervision of a doctor.

Most fentanyl related harm, overdose, and death is linked to illegally made fentanyl.

Illegally made fentanyl is often mixed with heroin and/or cocaine – with or without the user’s knowledge – to increase its euphoric effects.

If you suspect illegal activity, contact local law enforcement.

WHAT ABOUT HEROIN?

Heroin is an illegal and highly addictive opioid drug. Its use has increased dramatically in the United States among men and women, most age groups, and all income levels.

Nearly all of the people who used heroin also used at least 1 other drug or alcohol which is especially dangerous because it increases the risk of overdose.

Heroin is more likely to be addictive if it used with:

  • ALCOHOL = 2X
  • MARIJUANA = 3x
  • COCAINE = 15X
  • PRESCRIPTION OPIOIDS = 40X

If you suspect illegal activity, contact local law enforcement.

Drug Addiction – INCLUDING OPIOID USE DISORDER – IS A CHRONIC DISEASE
Common WARNING SIGNS of misuse, abuse, or addiction

People affected by drug addiction seek and use drugs in a compulsive, or difficult to control manner despite harmful consequences. Some warning signs include:

  • Neglecting responsibilities at work, school, or home because of drug use.
  • Using drugs under dangerous conditions or taking risks such as driving while on drugs.
  • Drug use that results in legal trouble such as stealing to support a drug habit.
  • Drug use that causes problems in relationships such as arguments with family members and loss of friends.
  • People affected by drug addiction may stop participating in activities they once enjoyed and may use drugs even when they realize the drugs could be causing problems.

If you, a loved one, friend or family member is struggling with addiction – don’t wait. Reach out. You just might save a life.

Visit the South Dakota Department of Social Services for help finding addiction treatment services

CAN OPIOID OVERDOSE BE
REVERSED?

NALOXONE is a non-addictive, life-saving drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose when administered in time.

South Dakota law allows naloxone to be prescribed to friends, family members, or other close third parties of a person at risk of an opioid overdose.

Efforts are underway to expand access to and use of naloxone by law enforcement and to increase training for emergency staff and distribution through local, community-based organizations.